Pages Menu
TwitterRssFacebook
Categories Menu

Posted by on Apr 15, 2013 in General, Jordan, Latest Posts, Middle East | 4 comments

Wadi Rum & the Dead Sea

 

Who wants to explore Wadi Rum & the Dead Sea and find out what Lawrence of Arabia was so captivated by?

Heading to the southern most part of Jordan we grabbed our gear and split into groups and jumped into our next mode of transport, 4X4s for Wadi Rum.

 

Wadi Rum

Wadi Rum

Wadi Rum

Wadi Rum

 

Heading off the highway through a small town on the edge of the rocky landscape in the old Nissan Patrols we left civilisation behind, ready for a night camping in the desert. Along the way we stopped at some places Lawrence of Arabia had used including and army outpost and a spring. We found carvings of ‘caravans’ (camels carrying goods) hundreds of years old, a natural rock arch and a beautiful red sand dune. It is easy to see what captivated Lawrence to stay here and although there are few trees, this raw landscape is truly awe inspiring.

 

Wadi Rum

Wadi Rum

The caravans

The caravans

Wadi Rum

The red sand dune

 

When we reached the camp we were greeted by the local Bedouin and shown to our cabins and rested on rugs and and cushions in a kind of outdoor lounge room. As the sun began to set we climbed the large rocky outcrop which protected our camp and looked out across the valley to the rest of Wadi Rum’s incredible formations.

 

Wadi Rum

Wadi Rum cabins

 

Then it was time for dinner, a feast of chicken and vegetables which had been cooked underground in what is called a ‘zarb’, alongside our usual favourites of humus, tabbouleh and pita bread. The bedouin then played some music and sang as we relaxed around the campfire.

 

Sunset over Wadi Rum

Sunset over Wadi Rum

Sunset over Wadi Rum

Sunset over Wadi Rum

 

Wadi Rum

Wadi Rum sunset

Wadi Rum

Wadi Rum sunset

Wadi Rum

Jen acting the goat

 

Next morning we headed out of the camp, this time in open top four-wheel drives and returned to the bus headed for Madaba and a stop along the way at the Dead Sea. With a quick lunch in a resort, we headed down to the private beach and covered ourselves in mineral rich mud before jumping into the Dead Sea. It is an incredible feeling being able to float effortlessly in the Dead Sea, which is about 35% salt making this possible.  I’m not sure whether the mud actually works or is just something the locals made up so they can laugh at tourists rubbing it all over each other but it was fun in any case.

 

Leaving Wadi Rum

Leaving Wadi Rum

The Dead Sea

The Dead Sea

Dead Sea

Mud montsers

Float in the Dead Sea

Floating in the Dead Sea

 

Afterward we felt very slimy and headed for the showers before hitting the road once more toward Madaba where we would spend our final night in Jordan.

 

Madaba

Heading to Madaba

 

4 Comments

  1. lol “jen acting the goat”
    as for that mud – thank god your swimming shorts were not red….would have made quite the xmas tree look….
    was the dead sea warm?

    • Yeah wouldnt be a good look. Yeah pretty warm actually, but slimy for some reason.

  2. Jordan looks fascinating, almost reminds me of the rock formations in Arizona, California etc. Did it seem that way to you, minus the Bedouins? Red sea adventures, dirty and delightful. xo Dar

    • Yeah the formations did remind me a lot of the Grand Canyon and Wadi Rum seemed a bit like Monument Valley in the Sates. Dead Sea adventures 😉 definitely worth it. x

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Wadi Rum - Jordan | Intact Nature - [...] Wadi Rum & the Dead Sea [...]

Post a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *